Discussion: Licensure Assignment

NP Core Competencies Assignment
December 3, 2021
Primary Care office Assignment.
December 3, 2021

Discussion: Licensure Assignment

Discussion: Licensure Assignment

Discussion: Licensure Assignment

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Week 7 discussion Discussion Part One You have completed your nurse practitioner education, likely one of the most challenging tasks you have ever undertaken. Several of your graduated colleagues live in different states, including California, Washington, and Illinois. After a year of primary care practice in your respective states, you get together for a reunion and share your practice perspectives. It is apparent that your experiences are not equal. Discussion Question: How do licensure, accreditation, certification, and education (LACE) considerations differ for APN clinical roles for these three states: California, Washington and Illinois? Provide evidence for your response. Discussion Part Two Inconsistent regulation of APN role and scope prevent a seamless healthcare system in which APN can practice. Discussion Question: What evidence-based strategies should be implemented to achieve continuity between state regulatory boards? Provide evidence for your response. Discussion Part Three Once a seamless entry into practice is achieved, it will become more likely that independent practice will follow. Discussion Question: Is independent NP practice allowed in your state? Discuss your opinion regarding independent NP practice. Provide evidence for your response.

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Property law
Part of the common law series
Types
Real property
Personal property
Community property
Acquisition
Gift
Adverse possession
Deed

Conquest
Discovery
Accession
Lost, mislaid, and abandoned property
Treasure trove
Bailment
License
Alienation
Estates in land
Allodial title
Fee simple
Fee tail

Life estate
Defeasible estate
Future interestremainder
Concurrent estate
Leasehold estate
Condominiums
Real estate
Conveyancing
Bona fide purchaser
Torrens title

Strata title
Deeds registration
Estoppel by deed
Quitclaim deed

Mortgage
Equitable conversion
Action to quiet title
Escheat
Future use control
Restraint on alienation
Rule against perpetuities
Rule in Shelley’s Case
Doctrine of worthier title
Nonpossessory interest
Lien
Easement
Profit
Usufruct
Covenant
Equitable servitude
Related topics
Fixtures
Waste
Partition
Practicing without a license

Property rights
Mineral rights
Water rightsprior appropriation
riparian
Lateral and subjacent support
Assignment
Nemo dat
Quicquid plantatur
Conflict of property laws
Blackacre
Security deposit
Other common law areas
Contract law
Tort law
Wills, trusts and estates
Criminal law
Evidence

Higher category: Law and Common law
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Licensure means a restricted practice or a restriction on the use of an occupational title, requiring a license. A license created under a “practice act” requires a license before performing a certain activity, such as driving a car on public roads.[1] A license created under a “title act” restricts the use of a given occupational title to licensees, but anyone can perform the activity itself under a less restricted title. For example, in Oregon, anyone can practice counseling, but only licensees can call themselves “Licensed Professional Counselors.”[2]Thus depending on the type of law, practicing without a license may carry civil or criminal penalties or may be perfectly legal. For some occupations and professions, licensing is often granted through a professional body or a licensing board composed of practitioners who oversee the applications for licenses. This often involves accredited training and examinations, but varies a great deal for different activities and in different countries.

Occupational licensing has the strongest public support for activities whose incompetent execution would be a health or safety threat to the public, such as practicing medicine. Licensing of low-risk businesses like florists and hair braiding salons is more controversial because licensing is inherently a form of restraint of trade. It creates a barrier to entry preventing some people from practicing the profession, benefiting existing licensees by reducing competition. This can harm consumers by raising prices and reducing innovation by new market entrants, and may slow overall economic growth.[3] Competition law can conflict with licensing practices if the licensing body favors its own licensees in ways that do not clearly protect the public.

Alternatives to individual licensure include requiring that at least one person on a premises be licensed and oversee unlicensed practitioners, permitting of the business overall, random health and safety inspections, general consumer protection laws, and deregulation in favor of voluntary private certifications or free market mechanisms such as customer review sites.